make a pop can alcohol stove

(Yep! It's Yet Another Article + Video About The Iconic 'Pop-Can Stove'!)

Since I first learned about backpackers making lightweight cooking stoves out of aluminum cans, I was hooked. And probably like other "stovies," the one that really caught my attention was the "Pepsi Can Stove."

No doubt the appeal is that it's not only ridiculously cool to be able to fit together a couple of recycled cans that way, but because the end result is so compact, lightweight, and burns exactly like the burner on your home stovetop!

While not one of the simplest alcohol stoves to assemble -- that honor will go to simpler open-flame stoves and the "SuperCat" Cat Food Can side-burning style -- it's also not one of the most complicated. Depending on which one of the several-dozen methods you choose, it's possible to have one made in 20-30 minutes.

In fact, this video could have been a lot shorter had I chosen the popular and dependable "crimping" method to fit the two halves together.

But I was interested to try a few methods I'd seen in videos that allowed you to very elegantly fit the two sides together perfectly, one inside the other, without any glue/epoxy and avoiding the slightly tedious task of crimping one of the halves neatly all the way around the sides so that it could fit into the other half. In the end, I eventually succeeded, but it took some experimenting with different fitting methods to make it work.

Conceptually, it's pretty easy to make and use a "Pop Can Stove."

Construction:

  1. Cut the bottoms off of two aluminum cans (about 3/4")
  2. Drill a small hole in the center of the "top" for refilling with alcohol
  3. Fit them together tightly
  4. Make tiny holes around the upper ledge

Lighting It Up:

  1. Fill with alcohol and plug the fill-hole firmly (ex. a screw or "penny")
  2. Prime the can by dripping extra fuel onto the top and bottom (using a priming pan or wick) and light the priming fuel
  3. Once the can is hot enough to boil the alcohol inside, the side burners will light themselves, and it will behave like a familiar stove burner.

From a birds-eye perspective, it's not too complex. But each of those steps has quite a few variations you could experiment with.

sucrets tin pocket stove

It's tough not to be totally enchanted by elegant simplicity of DIY Alcohol Backpacking Stoves!

For quite some time, backpackers and teenage troopers have been using these little devices -- made from assorted recycled cans configured in clever ways (like the iconic Pepsi Can Stove) -- as lightweight and clean-burning cooking gear, that despite their size, can cook up a meal as well as any full-size kitchen range. But outside of "ultralight" backpacking circles, it seems a lot of campers don't know about these amazing little stoves that you can easily make yourself.

While I love taking them on backpacking excursions, by far the bulk of my own interest in compact cooking isn't for out on the trail, but to completely replace the kitchen in my "tiny house", i.e. my homemade truck camper.

Unlike a full-size RV, I'm limited to the space in the bed of my truck -- about 5'x6' or 30 sq.ft.! Why take up that space with a "range" or even a relatively bulky "Coleman stove" type setup? By using my backpacking cook kit, I can condense my entire kitchen to fit in a large camp mug!

This video explores a variation on one of the simplest alcohol stove designs. Essentially, it's nothing more than a "tin can" filled with alcohol, with an absorbent wicking material to hold it in place and regulate the burn, and a screen to hold it all in place. (The Starlyte (by Zelph Stoves) is a really nice implementation of this idea.)

This project is a quick-and-dirty implementation of the same concept. 

The main variations I used in this project are:

  • a Sucrets tin (compare to an Altoids tin)

  • mineral wool (aka "rock wool") as the wicking material (instead of fiberglass or Perlite)

  • a simple pot stand made from a coat hanger, cut and bent into shape

 

While not as ridiculously simple and elegant as the SuperCat stove design (which doesn't even require a separate pot stand), the Sucrets Stove is about as simple as it gets. It also has the benefits of stowing its own pot stand and being easily "turned off" by shutting the lid.

You could just as easily use an Altoids tin (or any other similar candy tin), but depending on the size of your cook pot, the dimensions may change the way the integral pot stand needs to be bent in order to both support the pot and fit neatly into the tin for packing.

Watch the video to hear my commentary and see how it all fits together!